ecowatchorg:

Another Coal Chemical Spill Pollutes Public Waterway, This Time in Kentucky

On Friday, May 30, another coal-related chemical spill polluted a public waterway in Central Appalachia, killing hundreds of fish and alarming local residents.

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/06/10/coal-chemical-spill-pollutes-waterway/

(Reblogged from holygoddamnshitballs)

(Reuters) - A CSX Corp train carrying crude oil derailed and burst into flames in downtown Lynchburg, Virginia on Wednesday, spilling oil into the James River and forcing hundreds to evacuate.

In its second oil-train accident this year, CSX said 15 cars on a train traveling from Chicago to Virginia derailed at 2:30 p.m. EDT. Photos and video showed high flames and a large plume of black smoke. Officials said there were no injuries, but 300-350 people were evacuated in a half-mile radius.

City officials instructed motorists and pedestrians to stay away from downtown, while firefighters battled the blaze. Three railcars were still on fire as of 4 p.m., CSX said.

The fiery derailment a short distance from office buildings in the city of 77,000 was sure to bring more calls from environmentalists and activists for stricter regulations of the burgeoning business of shipping crude oil by rail.

(via  Reuters)

Explosion, fire at natural gas pipeline hub forces evacuation of Wyoming town

A small town in southwest Wyoming was evacuated Wednesday after an explosion and fire at a natural gas processing facility and major national pipeline hub. There were no reports of injuries.

The gas has been shut off, but people who were in Opal, about 100 miles northeast of Salt Lake City, went to an area about 3 miles outside of town as a precaution, said Lincoln County spokesman Stephen Malik. The town has about 95 residents.

"They were downwind from the plant," said Lincoln County Sheriff Shane Johnson. "The fire was still very active, and because of the nature of the processing that goes on there, that was the call that was made for safety reasons."

Johnson said he didn’t know when people would be allowed back into Opal.

No structures in the town were affected, and the fire was confined to the facility operated by pipeline operator Williams Partners LP, county officials said. Williams is based in Tulsa, Okla.

The explosion occurred in the plant’s cryogenic processing tower, a structure that chills unrefined natural gas to separate out impurities, but officials didn’t yet know what caused the blast.

All employees at the gas processing plant were accounted for, Williams spokesman Tom Droege said.


(via Explosion, fire at natural gas pipeline hub forces evacuation of Wyoming town - The Malta Independent)

4 hurt, 400 evacuated in natural gas explosion

The fire at the plant was extinguished within a couple of hours. Williams spokeswoman Michele Swaner in Salt Lake City said all 17 or 18 company employees were evacuated and accounted for. She added it was too early to determine the extent of the damage or the cause of the explosion.
(via  | The Columbian)

4:30 pm — the fire may be out but the natural gas is still leaking according to the report on OPB

BP confirmed this morning that it’s Whiting, Indiana refinery had leaked an unknown amount of crude oil into Lake Michigan. BP spokesman Scott Dean said that workers noticed what he described as a “sheen” on the water at about 4:30 a.m. this morning. “The discharge has stopped,” Dean told NBC Chicago, “and BP and its response team have deployed boom, containing the oil to a cove.” No injuries were reported as a result of the leak. BP has notified state and local officials of the leak, as well the U.S. EPA and Coast Guard, and has dispatched crews on the beach to begin cleaning up.

Favorable weather conditions have made containing the spill and cleanup easier; wind has been pushing the oil toward the shore, and lower temperatures coupled with the fact that 60 percent of the lake is still frozen over has made the oil a hard, waxy consistency.


(via BP Oil Leaks Into Lake Michigan (Because The Gulf Coast Wasn’t Enough): Chicagoist)

Barge leaking oil in Galveston Bay threatens migratory shorebirds TEXAS CITY —

Crews armed with infrared cameras planned to work through the night after a barge carrying nearly a million gallons of especially thick, sticky oil collided with a ship in Galveston Bay, leaking an unknown amount of the fuel into the popular bird habitat as the peak of the migratory shorebird season was approaching.
Booms were brought in to try to contain the spill, which the Coast Guard said was reported at around 12:30 p.m. Saturday by the captain of the 585-foot ship, Summer Wind. Coast Guard Lt. j.g. Kristopher Kidd said the spill hadn’t been contained as of 10 p.m., and that the collision was still being investigated.
The ship collided with a barge carrying 924,000 gallons of marine fuel oil, also known as special bunker, that was being towed by the vessel Miss Susan, the Coast Guard said. It didn’t give an estimate of how much fuel had spilled into the bay, but there was a visible sheen of oil at the scene.
Officials believe only one of the barge’s tanks was breached, but that tank had a capacity of 168,000 gallons.
“A large amount of that has been discharged,” Kidd said. He said a plan was being developed to remove the remaining oil from the barge, but the removal had not begun.
The barge was resting on the bottom of the channel, with part of it submerged. He said boom was being set up in the water to protect environmentally-sensitive areas and that people would be working through the night with infrared cameras to locate and skim the oil.
The barge was being towed from Texas City to Bolivar at the time. The Coast Guard said that Kirby Inland Marine, which owns the tow vessel and barge, was working with it and the Texas General Land Office at the scene.
The Coast Guard said six crew members from the tow vessel were in stable condition, but it offered no details about their injuries. (via Barge leaking oil in Galveston Bay threatens migratory shorebirds | Dallas Morning News)

Barge leaking oil in Galveston Bay threatens migratory shorebirds TEXAS CITY —

Crews armed with infrared cameras planned to work through the night after a barge carrying nearly a million gallons of especially thick, sticky oil collided with a ship in Galveston Bay, leaking an unknown amount of the fuel into the popular bird habitat as the peak of the migratory shorebird season was approaching.

Booms were brought in to try to contain the spill, which the Coast Guard said was reported at around 12:30 p.m. Saturday by the captain of the 585-foot ship, Summer Wind. Coast Guard Lt. j.g. Kristopher Kidd said the spill hadn’t been contained as of 10 p.m., and that the collision was still being investigated.

The ship collided with a barge carrying 924,000 gallons of marine fuel oil, also known as special bunker, that was being towed by the vessel Miss Susan, the Coast Guard said. It didn’t give an estimate of how much fuel had spilled into the bay, but there was a visible sheen of oil at the scene.

Officials believe only one of the barge’s tanks was breached, but that tank had a capacity of 168,000 gallons.

“A large amount of that has been discharged,” Kidd said. He said a plan was being developed to remove the remaining oil from the barge, but the removal had not begun.

The barge was resting on the bottom of the channel, with part of it submerged. He said boom was being set up in the water to protect environmentally-sensitive areas and that people would be working through the night with infrared cameras to locate and skim the oil.

The barge was being towed from Texas City to Bolivar at the time. The Coast Guard said that Kirby Inland Marine, which owns the tow vessel and barge, was working with it and the Texas General Land Office at the scene.

The Coast Guard said six crew members from the tow vessel were in stable condition, but it offered no details about their injuries. (via Barge leaking oil in Galveston Bay threatens migratory shorebirds | Dallas Morning News)